Wisconsin company to install rice-sized microchips in employees

on Jul24

Patrick Kramer of the company Digiwell shows his microchip implant to a visitor at a press preview of the Wear-it festival in Berlin on June 8, 2017.

Adam Berry | AFP | Getty Images

Patrick Kramer of the company Digiwell shows his microchip implant to a visitor at a press preview of the Wear-it festival in Berlin on June 8, 2017.

“We foresee the use of RFID technology to drive everything from making purchases in our office break room market, opening doors, use of copy machines, logging into our office computers, unlocking phones, sharing business cards, storing medical/health information, and used as payment at other RFID terminals,” Westby said in a company statement. “Eventually, this technology will become standardized allowing you to use this as your passport, public transit, all purchasing opportunities, etc.”

And while microchipping employees may sound like something out of a horror film, the company is partnering with Swedish company BioHax International, which already has many “chipped” employees.

Employees are not required to get the microchips, and Westby told the station there is no GPS tracking.



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